Powell speech: Job creation is narrowing in the economy

July 9, 2024 8:10 pm

Jerome Powell, Chairman of the US Federal Reserve (Fed), delivers the Semi-Annual Monetary Policy Report and responds to questions before the Senate Banking Committee on the first day of his Congressional testimony.

Key takeaways

“We are looking at where we can be faster and more forceful where appropriate in supervising banks.”

“Unemployment is still low by historical standards.”

“Job creation is narrowing in the economy.”

“Not sending any signals today about timing of future Fed policy actions.”

“Banks need to be honestly assessing their risk to manage it.”

“Large banks can manage this problem.”

“For smaller banks, we are in touch with those banks to make sure they can manage them.”

Inflation FAQs

Inflation measures the rise in the price of a representative basket of goods and services. Headline inflation is usually expressed as a percentage change on a month-on-month (MoM) and year-on-year (YoY) basis. Core inflation excludes more volatile elements such as food and fuel which can fluctuate because of geopolitical and seasonal factors. Core inflation is the figure economists focus on and is the level targeted by central banks, which are mandated to keep inflation at a manageable level, usually around 2%.

The Consumer Price Index (CPI) measures the change in prices of a basket of goods and services over a period of time. It is usually expressed as a percentage change on a month-on-month (MoM) and year-on-year (YoY) basis. Core CPI is the figure targeted by central banks as it excludes volatile food and fuel inputs. When Core CPI rises above 2% it usually results in higher interest rates and vice versa when it falls below 2%. Since higher interest rates are positive for a currency, higher inflation usually results in a stronger currency. The opposite is true when inflation falls.

Although it may seem counter-intuitive, high inflation in a country pushes up the value of its currency and vice versa for lower inflation. This is because the central bank will normally raise interest rates to combat the higher inflation, which attract more global capital inflows from investors looking for a lucrative place to park their money.

Formerly, Gold was the asset investors turned to in times of high inflation because it preserved its value, and whilst investors will often still buy Gold for its safe-haven properties in times of extreme market turmoil, this is not the case most of the time. This is because when inflation is high, central banks will put up interest rates to combat it. Higher interest rates are negative for Gold because they increase the opportunity-cost of holding Gold vis-a-vis an interest-bearing asset or placing the money in a cash deposit account. On the flipside, lower inflation tends to be positive for Gold as it brings interest rates down, making the bright metal a more viable investment alternative.

Feed from Fxstreet.com

MoneyMaker FX EA Trading Robot